Are French Bulldog Puppies Dangerous?

FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES

Children love French Bulldog puppies…

But small dogs grow into big dogs and they reach this state faster than children do. Therefore, a dog can become larger than a child and this can result in problems. As French Bulldogs are small in stature you won’t have this problem. They remain small even as adults.

If you have a male and a female French Bulldog

they probably won’t reproduce because their structure makes it very difficult for them to do so. It is for this reason that the majority of French Bulldogs are artificially inseminated and to make matters worse, they normally have to be delivered by a veterinary surgeon by caesarean-section.

So if you want a baby French bulldog…

remember that the pedigree French Bulldog puppy is generally made to order, at a price. It seems that the baby blue French Bulldog is much in demand at present. It is for this reason that baby blue French Bulldog puppies will be placed in many adverts online and offline. You will, of course, also find a French Bulldog puppy in various colours available from the same sources.


A French Bulldog’s litter is not normally larger than 3 or 4 puppies…

Now, because many dog breeders find it difficult to breed French Bulldogs they are expensive and not very plentiful. So it is unlikely that French Bulldog owners will be inundated with the puppies from these playful dogs in their homes if they have a French Bulldog adult male and female pair.

One of the problems with a smaller house…

that has a lot of people living in it is, the house can become quite warm. If you live in a constantly warm climate, this will probably result in health problems for your French Bulldog.

They are more suited to cooler climates…

and need to be kept as cool as possible all the time. If they remain too long in warm conditions, your French Bulldog could develop heatstroke, respiratory problems and skin diseases.

Apart from all this, raising a French Bulldog is fairly easy…

Even your children could do it!

To maintain your French Bulldog’s health… and good looks

you should make sure they are always clean and well brushed. A French Bulldog’s coat is short and shiny, as well as thin, and they don’t shed a lot of hair. Brushing them regularly will help to keep their coats glossy and clean and will prevent the fur from being tangled.

As with all dogs, you should brush their teeth at least twice a week…

using special toothpaste and toothbrush for dogs, also check and clip their toenails and take them to the vet regularly for an examination.

As was said in the beginning, French Bulldogs don’t grow very big…

Their full height is usually about 12 inches and they are not very heavy. They shouldn’t weigh more than 19 to 22 pounds for the small dog and 23 to 28 pounds for the larger.

And there you have it…

A French Bulldog is the perfect family dog. He will be your friend, companion, watchdog and an all-round member of your family.

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Why are Puppy Mills Bad?

Why Are Puppy Mills Bad And Why Are They The Wrong Choice?
If you have decided you want to own one of those beautiful puppies known as a French Bulldog, your next step is deciding where and how to acquire your new pet. You have a number of options, but you should avoid dogs that come from puppy mills. If you are wondering “Why are puppy mills bad?” this the is information you need before you buy a dog.

A Puppy Mill

A Puppy Mill

Are Puppy Mills Illegal?
Throughout the United States, many states have no regulations whatsoever on puppy mills. Other states have requirements for inspections or licensing, or both. Not nearly enough states have standards of care for dog breeders.

However, California and Maryland have taken a step in the right direction. They no longer allow pet stores to accept and sell dogs from puppy mills. From animal welfare organizations to private individuals, many people understand the need to ban puppy mills entirely.

 

Why Are Puppy Mills Bad?
The most important point you need know is, breeders who operate puppy mills only care about profits. As the entire business is about making money, they do not care about their dogs. There are numerous ways puppy mill breeders show lack of concern for their animals.

Dogs in puppy mills are bred as often as possible. Breeding of an individual dog can take place every time the dog is on heat. Mothers are forced to produce litter after litter of puppies, until their bodies are no longer capable of doing so. At this stage, considered useless to the breeder, some mothers are given away, but many are actually killed.

This repetitive breeding is harmful to both the mother dogs and their puppies. Both can suffer health complications from too frequent breeding. Puppy mill owners do not take this into consideration, as they are only concerned about their pockets.

Dogs and puppies in puppy mills often have horrible living conditions. One example is the practice of keeping these animals in cages. There can be numerous complications to this practice.

First, caged dogs rarely get enough exercise. They may never be let out of the cages at all. Second, the cages are often too small for the dogs. Third, cages with wire bottoms pose special health issues to the dog’s feet.

In addition, caged dogs do not have adequate heating, cooling, or fresh air. In some cases, they do not even have sufficient light.

Puppy mills are not always sanitary, either. A dog may be forced to remain in a cage with his own urine and waste. Dogs can experience other health issues from cages that are wet, dirty, and filled with germs.

When money is the only goal, puppies are sold when they are too young. When a puppy is taken away from its mother, it can develop behavioural problems and health issues.
With profits being the only concern, puppies and dogs do not receive appropriate care from a veterinarian. The breeder may attempt to treat the dogs himself, although he is not trained to do so. To save money, a breeder who needs to end a dog’s life may do this himself too. Instead of humane euthanasia, the dog may be drowned or shot.

The lack of care can be extended to avoid other expenses. The breeder may buy the cheapest dog food he can find, or force the dogs to subsist on human foods that are not appropriate for dogs. As the purpose of a puppy mill is to make money, puppy mill owners do not like to spend money on their dogs, so when you see a Cheap French Bulldog Puppy Sale, you should be seeing red flags also!

There are a number of ways puppy mill owners get away with inhumane treatment of their dogs. In most cases, they assume their cruel treatment of the animals will not be detected, and in some cases it works. There are ways prospective dog owners can be fooled.

The popularity of the internet has provided a new venue for unscrupulous puppy mill owners. When a person sees a picture of a cute puppy, it may even include a brief description. You may fall in love with the puppy immediately, and pay the breeder to ship it to you. If you take this approach, though, you may never know the facts about the breeder or his dogs. You may be quite disappointed if you receive a sick dog that requires medical care, or if your new puppy dies.

A second example is a pet store. You may not know most puppies sold in pet shops come from puppy mills. Even if you can see the puppy before you buy it, it can be a bad experience. The puppy may have been in poor health when he was delivered to the pet store, and caged even longer in the store. The cute little puppy you see in your local pet shop may have come from one of the many French bulldog puppy mills.

 

How To Find A Healthy French Bulldog
You may see an ad in your local newspaper that advertises French bulldog puppies for sale. This is one opportunity for you to see the difference between a reputable breeder and a puppy mill. You should never buy a dog, or make a deposit, without visiting the breeder in person. This is much easier when the breeder lives near you.

For those in America, a second resource is the American Kennel Club. You can check their National Breeder Referral, and their AKC Online Breeder Classifieds. You can find plenty of information about French Bulldogs, and a breeder who is right for you. If you cannot find the information you need, you can contact the American Kennel Club directly.

 

Why is it essential to find a reputable breeder when you want a French bulldog?
If you learn of a French bulldog puppy sale and the dog has come from a puppy mill, you will not have a good experience. You are likely to have many problems that you did not expect. A dog that was not taken care of properly can have health issues and behavioural issues. The dog was not properly socialized, so he may not get along with you, your family members, or other pets in your household.

A puppy mill dog can require unexpected veterinary care that is quite expensive. At its worst, the dog may not live very long. Even if he does not show serious health problems, his behaviour may be so bad that you will regret your decision and want to return him to the breeder. You can avoid all of these problems by buying a healthy dog from a good breeder.

 

How To Find A Reputable
French Bulldog Breeder
If you have never looked for a breeder before, you may not know what to expect or which questions you should ask. A good breeder will not be upset by questions, and will even encourage you to ask questions. He wants you to be completely happy with the dog you choose. The dog’s age, parents, habits, personality, and feeding schedule are some examples.

However, questions and answers only provide so much information. You should also make a point of visiting the breeder in person. While you will get a sense of his personality and how he treats his dogs, it is also your opportunity to see the dogs in their current environment. If you can envision how a puppy mill looks, you should have an entirely different impression with a legitimate kennel.

Mothers and pups should be kept together, but no animals should be confined in small cages. A good kennel has plenty of room for exercise and activity, both indoors and outdoors. The dogs should have fresh water and quality dog food. While reputable breeders may own quite a few dogs, their kennels are not like factories made for production. The dogs should be happy, healthy, and active.

The kennel should be clean, and so should the animals. Although it is impossible to keep a kennel spotlessly clean, it should be free from waste, odour, and debris. The dogs should appear well-groomed and cared for on a regular basis. Their eyes should be clear, and their ears should be clean.

If you see a dog you like, you should be encouraged to interact with him. Even a small puppy can respond to the sound of your voice, or when he is gently patted. If he is healthy, he will respond to you. As French bulldogs are noted for being alert, playful, and affectionate, these are some of the personality characteristics you should see.

In contrast, there are some telling signs that you do not want to do business with this particular breeder. He may be operating a puppy mill, or he may have something else to hide. First, he may not want to answer your questions. This is a bad sign when you want to buy a dog.

Second, he may not want you to visit the kennel, or may limit you to certain parts of the kennel. You can take this to mean he does not want you to see the dogs’ living conditions. Perhaps the kennel is dirty or overcrowded, or the dogs are in unhealthy cages.

Third, do not do business with a breeder who insists on choosing a dog for you. He may have one dog that is not in ideal health, or shows behavioural problems, and simply wants someone to buy it. Instead, take plenty of time to see all the puppies that are currently available, and choose the one you want. As the puppy will be living with you, it is entirely your decision.
Fourth, be suspicious if the price seems too low. It is helpful to learn the approximate cost of a French bulldog before you approach a breeder. If he is selling his dogs at a cheap price, you may not be getting a bargain. It is reasonable to assume there is something wrong with the dogs.

 

Reputable French Bulldog Breeders And You
When you locate a reputable breeder, expect him to ask questions. While you have the right to know you are buying a healthy animal, the breeder wants to know his dog is going to a good home. It is not unusual for a breeder to interview a prospective buyer. He may even want to visit your home and meet your family. Good breeders truly care about every one of their dogs.

Breeders who do not operate puppy mills often place a condition on selling their animals. He may want to be assured that you do not intend to breed the dog yourself. Not all breeders have this requirement, but do not be surprised if he expects you to have the dog only as a pet and a companion. Many breeders will flatly refuse to sell a dog to someone who plans to use it for breeding purposes.

 

A Good Experience With Your New Dog
A French bulldog is a true joy. With this new addition to your family, you can look forward to many delightful years ahead. When you want the best experience, though, take time to learn everything you can about the breeder and his dogs.

You can avoid disappointment and unnecessary expense by purchasing a healthy, socialized animal. You will only find a dog that meets these specifications when you find a breeder who loves his dogs, takes their needs seriously, and provides proper care for adult dogs and puppies alike.

Your new dog can be a wonderful companion for you and your entire family. If friendship with a French bulldog is what you are looking for, they are easy to find if you do not make the common mistakes.

Now that you know the answer to the question “Why are puppy mills bad?”, you know how to avoid a bad experience. You will not have to cope with all the problems that occur from buying a dog whose life was spent in a bad environment with little to no care. Instead, you can take a healthy little dog home with you, and you will always be glad you chose him.

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A LILAC FRENCH BULLDOG

A Lilac French Bulldog…

A Lilac French Bulldog

A Lilac French Bulldog

It goes without saying that at this time and age, most homes are considered incomplete without a pet. Pets have become so dear to human beings that they are now part of the family. One of the most common pets that people are so fond of is the dog. Besides guarding you and your belongings, dogs are also companions for you or your children especially when you are busy doing house chores.

There are various breeds of dogs that are attractive to human beings, and your choice depends on what you like. While some opt for large dogs, others prefer small dogs such as French Bulldogs. One of the most attractive dogs from this breed is a Lilac French Bulldog. If you are hearing about this dog for the first time, here I will give you a short introduction to what a Lilac French Bulldog is.

What is a Lilac French Bulldog?…

The Lilac French Bulldog is a rare breed of dog distinguished by its lilac colouration which is part of the French bulldog’s blue gene. Every lilac coloured French bulldog is naturally a blue gene carrier. It is a vital requirement for them to be a carrier and have the dominant lilac gene.

Newly born puppies have a soft blue fawnish colour but as they mature, the colour changes and you can clearly identify their pink coat. Their noses are reddish pink and at times greyish blue which proves that they are naturally blue-gene dogs.

In order to produce a Lilac French Bulldog, both the dam and the sire must have the chocolate and blue gene, be blue carriers or be blue themselves.

The DNA of a Lilac French Bulldog will check out at (d/d, b/b) which basically means that they have two copies of each blue and chocolate gene. Their DNA is unique and that’s what gives them their unique colouring that many people admire.

To be honest, there are very few Lilac French Bulldogs in the United States. It’s rare to find them on sale but when your lucky star shines on you and you find one, you may be forced to drain your bank account because they come with a demanding price tag. To be more specific, the cost of a lilac French puppy can start from $20,000 and above.

Size and Personality…

Generally, Lilac French Bulldogs are about 11-12 inches tall.

The female weighs 16-24 pounds while the male is slightly heavier at 20-28 pounds.

They are loving and smart and always wants to spend time with people. Because they are a fun-loving and freethinking they’re easy to train, especially when training entails praise, food rewards, and play.

Care…

The Lilac French Bulldog doesn’t require a lot of exercise. They have low energy levels and the only thing they require to keep them on good weight is a daily exercise which may entail playing in the yard or walking around the neighbourhood.

Even though they like playing, they are prone to heat exhaustion which forbids you from taking them to hot temperature areas for exercise. The best option is to schedule morning and evening hours for exercise when temperatures are friendlier for them.

Being a free thinker, the French Bulldog can adapt to various types of training and even though they are at times stubborn, don’t give up on them but try different training techniques.

Feeding…

The amount of feeds your dog consumes every day depends on their metabolism, size, the levels of activity, and age. However, it is recommendable that you feed them 1-1.5 cups of high-quality dry food every day.

This food should be divided into two and given at different time intervals perhaps one half in the morning and the other in the evening.

Instead of depending entirely on one type of dog food, try different types but ensure that they are of high-quality.

Grooming…

The Lilac French Bulldog is a unique dog with a short, smooth, fine, and lilac coat. The skin is loose and wrinkled particularly on the shoulders and head, and most importantly, they have a soft texture and are easy to groom because the only thing you need to do is to brush them to keep their coats healthy. Grooming should start when they are young.

Health…

Always check for any skin lesion, scabs, flaky skin, bare spots, and any signs of infections.

Also check eyes, ears, and teeth for any bad smell or discharge. For either of these, you should take your Frenchie to a vet. You should clean their ears regularly using a damp warm cloth and when you see that the edges of the ears are dry, apply baby oil to them.

The Lilac French Bulldog does not naturally wear their nails down, which means you should be the one to trim them to prevent painful splitting and tearing.

The facial wrinkles should always be clean and dry to prevent infection and when you bathe them dry them completely, especially on the folds. Bathing should be done once in a month using a dog shampoo.

Just like human beings, Lilac French Bulldogs is susceptible to illnesses. If you realize that your Frenchie is not as jovial and playful as usual, it’s good to seek professional guidance from a vet.

There are some common diseases associated with Lilac French Bulldogs, and even though they might not get all of them, it important to be aware of them, which include, among others:
• Hip Dysplasia
• Brachycephalic Syndrome
• Allergies
• Hemivertebrae
• Patellar Luxation
• Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD)
• Von Willebrand’s Disease
• Cleft Palate
• Elongated Soft Palate

Lifespan…

The Lilac French Bulldog has a lifespan that ranges from eleven to fourteen years.

 Final Thoughts

The Lilac French Bulldog is one of a kind and very desirable to have. It has large expressive eyes, friendly to small children and other pets, doesn’t bark much, and doesn’t require much of your time for grooming.

With all these amazing features, the Lilac French Bulldog is hard to come by, but never give up your search; keep checking on various dog sellers if they have one, or search for them online, but please be very careful that you do not deal with a puppy mill.

If you are a dog lover, without a dog!, It might be a good idea to start off with a Lilac French Bulldog and I am sure you will never regret adopting one and making them part of your family.

 

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What is a French Bulldog?

What is a French Bulldog? – The History of the French Bulldog

To answer the question “What is a French Bulldog?”, we will first have to look at what The history of a French Bulldog tells us. It all started when the lace makers of England first bred the French Bulldog in the eighteen hundreds. It was bred as a small domestic dog which was exported to France during the Industrial Revolution.What is a French Bulldog?

It is said that the French Bulldog is descended from the Molossus which originated from the Molossis people in the mountains of ancient Greece. The Molossus breed was generally a large species of dog.

The three countries most closely involved in the history and breeding of a French Bulldog are England, France and America in that order. The French Bulldog comes originally from the old English bulldog. In France the smaller bulldog was developed into a distinct French type, while in America the standard was set with the bat-ears.

At this time the breeders in England started to focus on changing the bulldog breed into a heavier dog with larger features. Others concentrated on breeding smaller dogs used for ratting and the dog-fighting business. This is how the bull terrier breeds originated.

The French Bulldog weight ranges from about twenty to twenty eight pounds and it was developed as a friendly, fun loving and cuddly in-house pet. This new species was very popular with those involved in the lace-making trade, specifically in Nottingham in the midlands of England.

As a smaller house dog was sought after, the French bulldog breeders crossed the bulldog with terriers and pugs and the Toy Bulldog became very popular by the year 1850 in England. Around 1860 when conformation or breed shows became popular the Frenchie, became a popular and regular participant. Classes for Frenchies weighing less than twelve pounds were also introduced.

Many small craft shops in England closed down during the Industrial Revolution causing many lace-makers to emigrate to Normandy in the North of France, taking their little bulldogs with them. The dogs’ popularity spread right down to Paris and with it the breeders in England found they had a thriving new export trade flourishing under the name “Bouledogues Français”.

Specialist dog exporters saw an opportunity and were exploiting the market to such a degree that by the year 1860 there were very few miniature bulldogs left in England. They became favourites to the ordinary Parisians, like dealers in the rag trade, cafe owners, butchers and so on. They were notorious favourites among the streetwalkers who were called “les belles de nuit”. Madame Palamyre, the proprietress of “La Souris” which was a favourite restaurant, had a Frenchie which was depicted as Bouboule in several works by the artist Toulouse Lautrec.

A breed of it’s own was developed…
Gradually the smaller type of Bulldog developed into a breed of its own, and was known as the “Bouledogue Francais”. This French version of the English name is the joining of two words, “boule”, (ball), and “dogue”, (mastiff). These dogs were well sought after by both ladies of society and the prostitutes of Paris alike, as well as being very fashionable with the creative set of artists, writers and fashion designers.

Unfortunately, as the breed developed away from its original Bulldog ancestry, records of these changes were not kept. Different strains of dog such as the terrier and Pug may have been introduced, so altering the breed’s long straight ears and the roundness of their eyes.

A New breed of Bulldog arrived in England in 1893 for the first time
English Bulldog breeders were very unhappy as the French imports did not meet the standards that were in place at this time, and they wanted to prevent the English stock being bred with the French. They were at first recognized by the Kennel Club as a subset of the existing English Bulldog and not as a completely different type of breed. Some English breeders tried to resurrect the Toy Bulldog breed at this time.

In 1885 an American-based breeding program was introduced.
Then in 1896 a French Bulldog was first exhibited at Westminster by Society Ladies. The Westminster Catalogue of 1897 had a picture of a French Bulldog which as yet had not been approved by the American Kennel Club. At the show both the bat eared and the rose eared species were presented but the judge, a Mr Sven Feltstein, only acknowledged the rose-eared ones. This upset the American attendees who in turn arranged an exhibition allowing only the bat-eared dogs to participate.

The Rules were Changed Again.
At the 1898 show in Westminster the Americans were dismayed to find that somebody had again changed the rules, without them knowing, and both the bat-eared and the rose-eared dogs were going to be present. They refused to compete and withdrew their dogs and the judges also refused to participate.

The American Kennel Club arranged to have their own French Bulldog show at the Waldorf-Astoria, a luxurious location. Bulldogs have been very popular in Western Europe in the earlier years, the English Bulldog being one of its ancestors.

Although the Americans had been importing French Bulldogs in the past. The dogs at that time were mostly owned by society ladies, who would display them at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1896. The ladies then began the formation of the French Bulldog Club of America, and the standard was set for the first time that the “erect bat ears” was the correct type.

In the early part of the 20th Century,
French Bulldogs remained fashionable with the high society set, dogs were being sold for as much as $3,000 to influential families such as the Rockefellers and the J.P. Morgans.
In 1902 a meeting was held at the house of Frederick W. Cousens, in order to set up a breed club which would gain individual recognition of the French Bulldog. The standard of breed they adopted was the same one currently in use in America, France, Germany and Austria. Although this was opposed by the Miniature Bulldog (the new name for the Toy Bulldog breed), and Bulldog breeders, the policy on the breed was changed by the Kennel club in 1905, and French Bulldogs became recognized as being separate from the English variety. Known initially as the Bouledogue Francais, the name was changed in 1912 to the “French Bulldog”.

The French Bulldog in America…
The American society was immediately drawn to this very cute and lovable little French Bulldog which quickly became a fashion statement. The British in general wanted nothing to do with French Bulldogs and left the breed to be tended by the French until the latter half of the nineteenth century.

The breeding incorporated some drastic physical changes…
Both the bat-ears and the rose-ears survived. When some wealthy American travelers reached France they could not resist taking some of these very lovable little bulldogs back home with them. They, in general, preferred the erect bat-ears while folk in France and in Britain preferred the rose-eared ones.

After the breed club was formed the breed was quickly recognized by the American Kennel Club and by 1906 the French Bulldog had achieved the status of being the fifth most popular breed of dog in America. This ranking fell to 54th place by 2003 but rose again to 11th place in 2013 as the dogs once again became popular.

The French Bulldog, was the first dog in the world to have a breed club dedicated to it through the French Bulldog Club of America.

The Decline in Popularity of the French Bulldog…
Among the East Coast Society people the Frenchie became more and more popular but this began to decline after the First World War and continued to do so for the following fifty years. The growing popularity of the Boston terrier seems to have contributed to the diminishing demand for the Frenchie.

Because of the rather large size of the head of the Frenchie, the mothers had trouble in natural whelping. Only in later years did more veterinarians become experienced in safe caesarean sections.

The summer heat and lack of air conditioning coupled with the depression in the nineteen thirties caused a major decline in interest in the purebred Frenchie and by 1940, with only 100 registered with the American Kennel Club the breed was classified as rare. World war two just made matters worse for the Frenchie and in Europe many dogs died from starvation.

In 1980 a magazine called The French Bullytin, focusing mainly on French Bulldogs, was born in America. It recorded the rise in French Bulldog registrations that was attributed to the new French Bulldog Club of America which encouraged younger breeders.

The French bulldog specialty shows that were held every year were transformed into Major events. By 1990 the breed registrations had risen to 632 which was a notable rise from the 170 of 1980. By the year 2006 the registrations had risen dramatically to well over 5,500.

The Frenchie has become so popular that today he is visible in cinema shows, advertisements and often seen in the company of celebrities. This alarming increase in demand is rather disconcerting when one realizes that many importers and breeders will complicate matters of pure bloodlines and healthy animals as greed sets in.

In Conclusion…
If someone was to pose you with the question “What is a French Bulldog?” after reading this page you would be able to answer the question quite well.

The new “Frenchie,” as they were now called, was a marvelous companion dog that gave much love and loyalty in an affectionate and playful manner to its owner. A French Bulldog makes an excellent companion which rarely barks unless it wants to draw attention.

Your French Bulldog is a very affectionate, patient, cuddly and loving animal who loves children and will easily adapt to other animals in the house if introduced properly.

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