What is a French Bulldog?

What is a French Bulldog? – The History of the French Bulldog

It is said that the French Bulldog is descended from the Molossus which originated from the Molossis people in the mountains of ancient Greece. The Molossus breed was generally a large species of dog.

The three countries most closely involved in the history and breeding of a French Bulldog are England, France and America in that order. The French Bulldog comes originally from the old English bulldog. In France the smaller bulldog was developed into a distinct French type, while in America the standard was set with the bat-ears.

At this time the breeders in England started to focus on changing the bulldog breed into a heavier dog with larger features. Others concentrated on breeding smaller dogs used for ratting and the dog-fighting business. This is how the bull terrier breeds originated.

The French Bulldog weight ranges from about twenty to twenty eight pounds and it was developed as a friendly, fun loving and cuddly in-house pet. This new species was very popular with those involved in the lace-making trade, specifically in Nottingham in the midlands of England.

As a smaller house dog was sought after, the French bulldog breeders crossed the bulldog with terriers and pugs and the Toy Bulldog became very popular by the year 1850 in England. Around 1860 when conformation or breed shows became popular the Frenchie, became a popular and regular participant. Classes for Frenchies weighing less than twelve pounds were also introduced.

Many small craft shops in England closed down during the Industrial Revolution causing many lace-makers to emigrate to Normandy in the North of France, taking their little bulldogs with them. The dogs’ popularity spread right down to Paris and with it the breeders in England found they had a thriving new export trade flourishing under the name “Bouledogues Français”.

Specialist dog exporters saw an opportunity and were exploiting the market to such a degree that by the year 1860 there were very few miniature bulldogs left in England. They became favourites to the ordinary Parisians, like dealers in the rag trade, cafe owners, butchers and so on. They were notorious favourites among the streetwalkers who were called “les belles de nuit”. Madame Palamyre, the proprietress of “La Souris” which was a favourite restaurant, had a Frenchie which was depicted as Bouboule in several works by the artist Toulouse Lautrec.

A breed of it’s own was developed…
Gradually the smaller type of Bulldog developed into a breed of its own, and was known as the “Bouledogue Francais”. This French version of the English name is the joining of two words, “boule”, (ball), and “dogue”, (mastiff). These dogs were well sought after by both ladies of society and the prostitutes of Paris alike, as well as being very fashionable with the creative set of artists, writers and fashion designers.

Unfortunately, as the breed developed away from its original Bulldog ancestry, records of these changes were not kept. Different strains of dog such as the terrier and Pug may have been introduced, so altering the breed’s long straight ears and the roundness of their eyes.

A New breed of Bulldog arrived in England in 1893 for the first time
English Bulldog breeders were very unhappy as the French imports did not meet the standards that were in place at this time, and they wanted to prevent the English stock being bred with the French. They were at first recognized by the Kennel Club as a subset of the existing English Bulldog and not as a completely different type of breed. Some English breeders tried to resurrect the Toy Bulldog breed at this time.

In 1885 an American-based breeding program was introduced.
Then in 1896 a French Bulldog was first exhibited at Westminster by Society Ladies. The Westminster Catalogue of 1897 had a picture of a French Bulldog which as yet had not been approved by the American Kennel Club. At the show both the bat eared and the rose eared species were presented but the judge, a Mr Sven Feltstein, only acknowledged the rose-eared ones. This upset the American attendees who in turn arranged an exhibition allowing only the bat-eared dogs to participate.

The Rules were Changed Again.
At the 1898 show in Westminster the Americans were dismayed to find that somebody had again changed the rules, without them knowing, and both the bat-eared and the rose-eared dogs were going to be present. They refused to compete and withdrew their dogs and the judges also refused to participate.

The American Kennel Club arranged to have their own French Bulldog show at the Waldorf-Astoria, a luxurious location. Bulldogs have been very popular in Western Europe in the earlier years, the English Bulldog being one of its ancestors.

Although the Americans had been importing French Bulldogs in the past. The dogs at that time were mostly owned by society ladies, who would display them at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1896. The ladies then began the formation of the French Bulldog Club of America, and the standard was set for the first time that the “erect bat ears” was the correct type.

In the early part of the 20th Century,
French Bulldogs remained fashionable with the high society set, dogs were being sold for as much as $3,000 to influential families such as the Rockefellers and the J.P. Morgans.
In 1902 a meeting was held at the house of Frederick W. Cousens, in order to set up a breed club which would gain individual recognition of the French Bulldog. The standard of breed they adopted was the same one currently in use in America, France, Germany and Austria. Although this was opposed by the Miniature Bulldog (the new name for the Toy Bulldog breed), and Bulldog breeders, the policy on the breed was changed by the Kennel club in 1905, and French Bulldogs became recognized as being separate from the English variety. Known initially as the Bouledogue Francais, the name was changed in 1912 to the “French Bulldog”.

The French Bulldog in America…
The American society was immediately drawn to this very cute and lovable little French Bulldog which quickly became a fashion statement. The British in general wanted nothing to do with French Bulldogs and left the breed to be tended by the French until the latter half of the nineteenth century.

The breeding incorporated some drastic physical changes…
Both the bat-ears and the rose-ears survived. When some wealthy American travelers reached France they could not resist taking some of these very lovable little bulldogs back home with them. They, in general, preferred the erect bat-ears while folk in France and in Britain preferred the rose-eared ones.

After the breed club was formed the breed was quickly recognized by the American Kennel Club and by 1906 the French Bulldog had achieved the status of being the fifth most popular breed of dog in America. This ranking fell to 54th place by 2003 but rose again to 11th place in 2013 as the dogs once again became popular.

The French Bulldog, was the first dog in the world to have a breed club dedicated to it through the French Bulldog Club of America.

The Decline in Popularity of the French Bulldog…
Among the East Coast Society people the Frenchie became more and more popular but this began to decline after the First World War and continued to do so for the following fifty years. The growing popularity of the Boston terrier seems to have contributed to the diminishing demand for the Frenchie.

Because of the rather large size of the head of the Frenchie, the mothers had trouble in natural whelping. Only in later years did more veterinarians become experienced in safe caesarean sections.

The summer heat and lack of air conditioning coupled with the depression in the nineteen thirties caused a major decline in interest in the purebred Frenchie and by 1940, with only 100 registered with the American Kennel Club the breed was classified as rare. World war two just made matters worse for the Frenchie and in Europe many dogs died from starvation.

In 1980 a magazine called The French Bullytin, focusing mainly on French Bulldogs, was born in America. It recorded the rise in French Bulldog registrations that was attributed to the new French Bulldog Club of America which encouraged younger breeders.

The French bulldog specialty shows that were held every year were transformed into Major events. By 1990 the breed registrations had risen to 632 which was a notable rise from the 170 of 1980. By the year 2006 the registrations had risen dramatically to well over 5,500.

The Frenchie has become so popular that today he is visible in cinema shows, advertisements and often seen in the company of celebrities. This alarming increase in demand is rather disconcerting when one realizes that many importers and breeders will complicate matters of pure bloodlines and healthy animals as greed sets in.

In Conclusion…
If someone was to pose you with the question “What is a French Bulldog?” after reading this page you would be able to answer the question quite well.

The new “Frenchie,” as they were now called, was a marvelous companion dog that gave much love and loyalty in an affectionate and playful manner to its owner. A French Bulldog makes an excellent companion which rarely barks unless it wants to draw attention.

Your French Bulldog is a very affectionate, patient, cuddly and loving animal who loves children and will easily adapt to other animals in the house if introduced properly.

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Stop, and kill your fear of What The French Bulldog is

The Federation Cynologique Internationale(FCI), the world governing body of dog breeds recognizes about 340 breeds in existence today. The American Kennel Club, on the other hand, accept only 167.

So choosing the right pet for you can be extremely hard, to say the least. You have so many aspects that you need to take into consideration beforehand, that it gets extremely hard to actually make the final choice.

This is where we come in. In this short article, we will be showcasing one of the most popular breeds out there, aka the French Bulldog. If you find this dog appealing, then we highly recommend adding one to your family. But first, let us clarify What The French Bulldog is?

Some French Bulldog Information Facts are that the dog is a small breed that is known for just how devoted it gets to its owner. It’s been declared an official breed back in the 1800s in England, and ever since its popularity has increased tremendously with time, so much so that it’s actually quite difficult to find one for a reasonable price any more.

It makes for a great house pet. Not only is it extremely playful, but it’s also very gentle with children. Thanks to its loving personality and its small size, it’s one of the few dog

breeds out there that can be entrusted around your baby at all times. Although it does love chasing after cats every now and then, it usually prefers the comfort of a couch next to its owners.

Things get a bit annoying though when it comes to the drooling part. Any French Bulldog owner out there will tell you that this breed is notorious for just how much it drools all over the place. Because of this, we suggest that you change your dog’s blankets every day because you wouldn’t want it to drown in its own drool over the course of a couple of days, would you?

As is the case with most of these miniature breeds, its health is very easily threatened by most any virus out there. Its stubby little legs grow tired after running for a short period of time, and if the weather isn’t perfect, your French Bulldog might end up getting sick immediately. Because of this, we suggest that you keep an eye out for any sort of possible danger when it comes to their health.

Keep them inside at all times when the weather is below average, but don’t forget to make sure that it moves around enough on a daily basis. Sure, it might sound like a chore at first, but believe us, this dog breed is definitely worth the time and effort.

 Training wise, since this dog breed is a result of its bulldog ancestors and the local ratters from Paris, it’s no surprise that French Bulldog training is a relatively easy exercise. Just make sure that you have a bunch of dog treats as rewards and your dog will jump to the moon and back in order to please you.

One aspect of this breed’s life that might be quite disconcerting for the owner is its tendency to bark and howl every now and then. This can’t really be helped, but French Bulldogs tend to bark at anything that moves during the night, which might annoy a lot of owners, but if you can handle a couple of barks every now and then, you’ll eventually forget about this tick that it has.

We know that it may sound cruel at first, but make sure that your French Bulldog gets to do its daily exercises, otherwise, it may get fat and unhealthy in no time. As mentioned previously, this dog breed is extremely prone to diseases and such, and because of this, it is also more likely to become a couch potato overnight if you don’t take good care of it. The good thing about it is that French Bulldogs are extremely playful too, so as long as you make it seem like a game, the dog will eventually end up sweating while having fun alongside you.

Grooming the French Bulldog is another positive aspect regarding the breed. It’s incredibly easy to maintain, just make sure that the bath is warm enough so your dog doesn’t accidentally end up catching a cold. Usually, you’d have to spend a lot of money on different products, but with the French Bulldog all you need is a warm bath every now and then and they’ll pretty much be handling the rest of the job on their own. 

If you do plan on getting a French Bulldog sooner than later, then we have to warn you that this breed gets extremely territorial from the moment you bring it home. Although it’s not prone to starting fights with other dogs at the drop of a coin, it can become jealous enough that it can end up barking all day and night at any intruders. On one hand, it makes for a great watchdog, but on the other hand, it does get extremely annoying with time.

If you wish to keep your house clean, this might not be the best breed for you, but overall it’s not the worst either. Thanks to its health sensitivity, we can’t really recommend this dog breed to first timers that work full-time jobs, but if you have the time and patience to deal with them on a daily basis, then you’ll soon learn just how lovable this breed can really be. 

All in all, is a French Bulldog worth getting? The short answer is yes. It makes for a great house pet and although it’s not the easiest to maintain, the amount of love and affection that it surrounds you with will more than make up for it. We also recommend that you only get one of them at a time, because as we mentioned previously, they get extremely territorial, and if you don’t pay attention to them every time you lay your eyes on them, they might get quite anxious and they can even end up breaking stuff just to attract your attention. 

If you think that the positives outweigh the negatives, then definitely give this dog breed a try, it won’t disappoint you in the least if you know what to expect from it and how to treat it.

I hope you have enjoyed this little introduction to what The French Bulldog is and ask that you forward it to someone else who you think would also enjoy it.

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What is a French Bulldog Boston Terrier mix?

What is a French Bulldog Boston Terrier Mix?

It’s nearly 2018, and it feels like there are more mixed breeds out there than there are normal breeds, doesn’t it? Because of how many new breeds are discovered every year, it feels like the world is getting more and more divided on which is the superior breed. In this short article we will be discussing about a certain breed mix that has caused quite a ruckus because of how random it seems.

Not only does it mix two of the most popular breeds out there, aka the French Bulldog and the Boston Terrier, but it also makes for a very original breed that has already gotten dozens of names so far. Probably the most consistent name that the public has chosen for this breed is the Frenchton, or the Frenton, if you will, but people also call this breed names like the Faux French Bulldog, the Frenchbo Bulldog or even the Boston Frenchie.

No matter what you prefer to call it, the facts remain unchanged, this dog breed is definitely one of a kind. The  French Bulldog Boston Terrier mix puppies are very small in size at first, but they do grow out of it, so don’t confuse them for Chihuahuas or some other extremely small dog breed out there. But, what is the Boston Terrier French Bulldog mix? Well, to put it bluntly, the French Bulldog Boston Terrier puppies are the love-children of those two amazing breeds that have their own sort of personalities and their own physical traits.

What sets the French Bulldog mixes apart from the ordinary French Bulldog is first and foremost the look. While most French Bulldogs are usually one color (most of the time they are black, brown or white/grey) with another colored stripe down their necks and across their tummies, the French Bulldog Boston Terriers actually have different patterned fur colors. Sure, you can still find a French Bulldog Boston Terrier mix that’s mono-colored with a colored stripe down their necks and across their tummies, but the grand majority of them sport different looks that really liven up their look.

Behavior wise, the French Bulldog Boston Terrier puppies tend to be a bit more agitated than purebred French Bulldogs. Unlike the purebreds, the mixed puppies tend to be quite a handful on a daily basis, but still, this can easily be corrected with a bit of training, which is where our next point comes in.

Training wise, the Boston Terrier French Bulldog mix seems to be a bit annoying and uneducated at first, but we can assure you that they can easily be trained if you have enough patience to do so. They are definitely harder to train than the purebred Boston Terrier or the purebred French Bulldog, but if you can get past that you’ll easily understand why so many people have opted to adopt one of them over the purebred option.

Another main reason as to why people love these French bulldog mixes is the fact that they are so small and compact and easy to keep occupied at all times, which makes them perfect for life in a smaller sized apartment. Most college students would rather have a Boston Terrier French Bulldog mix over most any other breed out there just because they don’t want to have to keep their eyes on their dogs at all times. As long as you have more than one of them hanging around it shouldn’t be hard for them to amuse themselves.

The Frenchton is definitely a weirder breed, to say the least, but nonetheless, it’s still a very good companion dog. Considering the fact that it is the lovechild of two companion dog breeds, it shouldn’t come off as a shock that the Frenchton is very good at doing just that. Food wise, this mix doesn’t really showcase any sort of preference, as long as it’s nutritious and delicious, it will always finish its plate.

Exercise wise, if you already own a Boston Terrier or a French Bulldog then you most likely won’t be surprised to find out that the Frenchton doesn’t exactly require that much exercise to go about its day. As long as you take the time to go out once per day with it, your dog will be in perfectly good shape. Oh, and while we’re on the subject of health, the Frenchton is one of those breeds that never seems to really get sick, unless something serious is going on. This can be taken off in two different ways. It does mean that generally they never get sick, but when they do, you need to do whatever it takes to make sure that they get their treatment according to their needs.

So, really, what is a French Bulldog Boston Terrier mix? Well, it’s a special breed that has been officially recognized as a crossbreed by the Designer Dogs Kennel Club (DDKC), the Dog Registry of America (DRA), the Designer Breed Registry (DBR), the American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC) and the International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR). Although it has yet to be recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), it shouldn’t come off as a surprise to anyone that this breed is getting more and more popular on a daily basis. So, what sets this one apart from every other breed out there? We think that every single Frenchton proud owner can confirm that it’s in their behavior. A lot of people will argue that it all depends on the dog’s personal mentality, but if you’ve owned enough dog breeds so far, then you know that that’s not exactly true. Depending on the breed of the dog, the dog can be aggressive (the Pit Bull Terriers, the Rottweilers or the German Shepherds) or it can be calm (The Shih Tzu, the Chow Chow or the Boston Terrier), so we can safely say that the Frenchton is one of the most relaxed and loving dog breeds out there without a doubt in our mind.

Sure, they can be quite challenging if they are not trained properly, but no matter what, we’ve never heard of a Frenchton biting its owner’s hand. This makes them one of the best dog breeds out there for younger individuals or married couples. This dog breed is amazing around babies too because of its calm nature, and not only that, but since it is so calm and relaxed, it makes for a great “first pet” for a child.

As long as you’ve trained them enough, the French Bulldog and Boston Terrier mix will never disappoint you. But hey, don’t let us stop you from showcasing your own whacky encounters with these loveable pets. Tell us what you think about the Frenchton and what you like or dislike about them. No dog is a perfect replica of another one, so we can never be short of stories. But anyway, we hope that you enjoyed this short article as much as we enjoyed writing it!

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